One Week: To Do

So, we know the blog has been pretty quiet the last few weeks. When you take a look at our to-do list you’ll understand why! We have both been out of work since June 6th. We thought we would have a leisurely time packing up and knocking items off the checklist. Little did we know that we would be working all day every day to get everything done! If you look close at the list, you’ll notice a lot more things are marked DONE, but there are a lot more things on it too… things we didn’t know we had to do until now. ACK! But luckily, we are on schedule for our June 29th departure to NYC.

PLANNING

  • Contact and plan our safari – DONE
  • Make lodging arrangements for Johannesburg – DONE
  • Explore Travel Insurance Options & select/purchase policy – DONE
  • Add pages to both passports  – NOT NEEDED TILL ASIA
  • check visa/passport requirements for all countries – DONE
  • Get passport photos taken for visas (have several printed) – DONE
  • Scan all documents into digital format and save to both emails
  • Gather all CC contact numbers, embassy numbers, etc. – download app? – DONE
  • Get new international drivers licenses – DONE
  • Get family and friends setup with Skype/Viber – HALF DONE
  • set temporary change of address with post office
  • Finalize packing lists
  • Put together med kit – HALF DONE
  • figure out how to unlock Eric’s phone – DONE
  • Figure out what to do with Della’s phone – DONE
  • decide on final packs – DONE
  • decide on final plug options (give dad others to return) – DONE
  • purchase plane ticket to NYC – DONE
  • decide where to stay while in NYC – DONE
  • purchase plane ticket to South Africa – DONE
  • purchase plane ticket to Prague – DONE
  • purchase train ticket Johannesburg to Capetown – DONE
  • Collect travel planning documents (scanned/packed) – HALF DONE
  • Contact insurance company related to cars – DONE
  • fill out power of attorney documents (general and medical)
  • Copies of Safari Info to parents
  • Finalize Safari – DONE
  • Book Air BnB Prague

HOUSE/STUFF

  • Rent our house – DONE
  • write a lease for our house rental – DONE
  • Donate stuff not worth selling – HALF DONE
  • Make arrangements for storage of the amount we plan to keep – DONE
  • Pack up the house
    • Study – DONE
    • Master Bedroom – HALF Done
    • Guest Bedroom 1 – HALF DONE
    • Guest Bedroom 2 – DONE
    • Kitchen – HALF DONE
    • Living Room – HALF Done
    • Basement big room – Mostly Done
    • Basement sound room – DONE
    • bathroom 1 – DONE
    • bathroom 2 – DONE
    • master bathroom – HALF DONE
    • garage
    • utility room – HALF DONE
  • Sell extra clothes on ebay – HALF DONE
  • discontinue utility services – DONE

PETS

  • Texi to vet – DONE
  • Texi to TX – DONE

MEDICAL

  • Make a visit to our travel doc for meds/vaccines – DONE
  • Dentist appointments – DONE
  • Final doctors appointment – DONE
  • Eye exams – new glasses (della) – DONE
  • figure out when insurance ends – DONE July 1
  • Della – get new orthodics – DONE
  • Fill prescriptions – DONE

MONEY$

  • Finish up credit card minimum spends – DONE
  • Cancel unnecessary credit cards – HALF DONE
  • decide which cards to continue gaining miles on – DONE
  • notify all cards of international travel – HALF DONE
  • set up venmo – DONE
  • Get updated credit/debit cards – HALF DONE

TO BUY

  • External Hard drives – DONE
  • wire padlocks (TSA) – DONE
  • space on the cloud for storage (decide what spaces we will use: dropbox, google drive, other??) – DONE
  • rain covers/travel covers for packs – DONE
  • drain plugs – DONE
  • extra camera batteries (della) – DONE
  • buy more camera memory cards – DONE
  • Good walking/hiking/zumba shoes – DONE
  • good sandals – DONE
  • travel clothing – DONE
  • New phone for Della – DONE
  • VPN – DONE

EVERYTHING ELSE

  • Get website up and running – DONE
  • Photo website up and linked into our Blog – DONE
  • Della – figure out how to pack/transition classroom – DONE
  • Buy new washer – DONE
  • Buy new dryer – DONE
  • Install washer/dryer – DONE
  • Have going away party – DONE
  • Eric – learn/practice driving stick shift
  • Eric – transition to shaving with bladed razor – DONE
  • Eric- get LASIK – DONE
  • Della – new driver’s license – DONE?
  • Eric- New driver’s license – DONE?
  • Della – renew license plates – DONE?
  • Modify Netflix Subscription
  • Clean house
  • Clean cars

Two Months: To Do

As of May 2, we are two months from our departure date! There is so much to do. We decided to make a list to help us celebrate what we’ve done and keep track of what is left.

PLANNING

  • Contact and plan our safari – DONE
  • Make lodging arrangements for Johannesburg
  • Explore Travel Insurance Options & select/purchase policy
  • Add pages to both passports  – NOT NEEDED TILL ASIA
  • check visa/passport requirements for all countries
  • Get passport photos taken for visas (have several printed)
  • Scan all documents into digital format and save to both emails
  • Gather all CC contact numbers, embassy numbers, etc. – download app?
  • Get new international drivers licenses
  • Get family and friends setup with Skype/Vyber
  • set temporary change of address with  post office
  • Finalize packing lists
  • Put together med kit
  • figure out how to unlock Eric’s phone?
  • Figure out what to do with Della’s phone
  • decide on final packs
  • decide on final plug options (give dad others to return)
  • purchase plane ticket to NYC
  • purchase plane ticket to South Africa – DONE
  • purchase plane ticket to Prague – DONE
  • purchase train ticket Johannesburg to Capetown
  • Collect travel planning documents (scanned/packed)
  • Contact insurance company related to cars
  • fill out power of attorney documents (general and medical)

HOUSE/STUFF

  • Rent our house – HALF DONE
  • write a lease for our house rental
  • Sell books on amazon?? (eric)
  • Donate stuff not worth selling – HALF DONE
  • Make arrangements for storage of the amount we plan to keep
  • Pack up the house
    • Study
    • Master Bedroom
    • Guest Bedroom 1
    • Guest Bedroom 2
    • Kitchen
    • Living Room
    • Basement big room
    • Basement sound room
    • bathroom 1
    • bathroom 2
    • master bathroom
    • garage
    • utility room
  • Sell extra clothes on ebay
  • discontinue utility services

PETS

  • Texi to vet – SCHEDULED
  • Texi to TX – SCHEDULED

MEDICAL

  • Make a visit to our travel doc for meds/vaccines – SCHEDULED
  • Dentist appointments – SCHEDULED
  • Final doctors appointment – SCHEDULED/DONE
  • Eye exams – new glasses (della) – DONE
  • figure out when insurance ends – DONE July 1

MONEY$

  • Finish up credit card minimum spends – DONE
  • Cancel unnecessary credit cards
  • decide which cards to continue gaining miles on
  • notify all cards of international travel

TO BUY

  • External Hard drives – DONE
  • wire padlocks (TSA)
  • space on the cloud for storage (decide what spaces we will use: dropbox, google drive, other??)
  • rain covers/travel covers for packs
  • drain plugs
  • extra camera batteries (della) – DONE
  • buy more camera memory cards – DONE
  • Good walking/hiking/zumba shoes
  • good sandals – DONE
  • travel clothing – MOSTLY DONE

EVERYTHING ELSE

  • Get website up and running – DONE
  • Photo website up and linked into our Blog
  • Della – figure out how to pack/transition classroom
  • Buy new washer
  • Buy new dryer – DONE
  • Install washer/dryer
  • Have going away party
  • Eric – learn/practice driving stick shift
  • Eric – transition to shaving with bladed razor – DONE
  • Eric- get LASIK – DONE
  • Della – advertise student blog

I Wear Your Granddad’s (Travel) Clothes… I Look Incredible!

As we’ve been planning for our trip, we have had to think about what clothes we want to bring that can stand up to a year of travel. We’ve read all about getting fabrics that are durable, quick drying, odor resistant, etc. The easy way to do this would be to go to REI and have ourselves a shopping spree…

but that’s not really our style!

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We’ve been shopping for our travel clothes at… surprise, surprise… the THRIFT SHOP!

Why the Thrift Store?

We’ve always shopped at the thrift store for a cheap source of everyday clothes. As part of keeping our trip affordable, we figured we would take the same approach when searching for travel clothes. You can find quality clothing for reasonable prices. Despite Macklemore’s song, it’s not all multi-generational hand-me-downs or quirky, outlandish things. Brand names are not that hard to find.

How to Search

It does require a little bit of extra effort to find items appropriate for travel. It’s not like there is a special travel section like you might find at a “new goods” store. First, we did our research on the kinds of things that we were looking for. Most people tout clothing made out of synthetic fabrics like polyester because it dries quickly. Other people say merino wool is even better for temperature control and odor resistance. Most thrift stores organize all of their clothes by size (though some by color). We have gotten pretty good at gauging fabric as we’re flipping through hanger after hanger of shirts or pants. We have also mastered the art of finding the tag that lists fabric type and care in almost no time at all.

What We’ve Found

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Eric’s Haul

 

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Della’s Haul

 

We were excited to find some of the brand names that we would probably have searched for if we were looking for new clothes such as Go Lite, REI, and Columbia.

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What’s Left?

We aren’t only shopping at the thrift store. Certain items, like underwear and shoes, we think are better to buy new. Also, we have received some excellent gifts of other new items. We have also utilized Ebay and Sierra Trading Post (which has been great with coupons and an easy return policy).

We definitely recommend making the thrift store part of your travel shopping plan!

Macklemore said it well… “One man’s trash, that’s another man’s come up!” 

 

 

 

Traveling for a Year: Harder or Easier than “Real Life” ?

As you can imagine, the anticipation for a year long journey is intense. We have been thinking about and looking forward to this trip for a very long time. As the time draws closer (3 months and 6 days!!) I have been swinging back and forth between two mental states:

  1. Oh my gosh, I can’t wait to get out of here. The day to day grind of work and life is killing me! Life on the road will be so much easier!

    and …

  2. Oh my gosh, I can’t believe we’re actually doing this. I’m terrified. I won’t get to sleep in my own bed and curl up comfortably in my own home for a YEAR?! I have to live for a whole year with only the clothes that fit in my backpack? That is going to be really difficult!

So, is traveling for a year harder or easier than our “real lives”??  Both, perhaps?

Traveling will be easier.

  • No day to day grind! We will not be feeling the pressure of jobs or bosses or any of those normal “things you have to do.” We won’t ever feel bored with life.
  • We will have more choices about how to spend each day. If we want to rest, we rest. If we want to go out, we go out. If we enjoy a city or town, we get to stay longer. If we don’t find that something meets our expectations, we can get out of there more quickly. If we meet cool people who are going somewhere we didn’t even think of, we can change our plans on a whim and join them!
  • We will have a lot fewer schedules to keep. This sounds like the ones above, but has an extra layer. There will be much less time pressure. We will be able to forget about time for days at a time if we feel like it!
  • Sleeping in! This is really similar to the above bullet, but I mean come on! We can sleep in on any day we want!
  • And, the obvious – We can lay in hammocks sipping beers whenever we want =)

IMG_8849

 

 

but…

Traveling will be harder.

  • We will be pushed outside our comfort zones every day. We will be navigating cultures and locations so different from our own constantly.
  • There won’t be a place that we can call “home.” We will constantly be on the move, living out of small backpacks, sleeping in all manner of places from the really grand to the really not, wearing the same set of clothes day in and day out.
  • We will be far away from friends and family having to function without any of the support system that we are used to. At times we will fill completely disconnected from everyone as lives will continue on without us: potential weddings, babies being born, birthdays, and holidays will proceed where we can’t be present.
  • Every day will require new and different kinds of problem solving. Talk about mental exercise! We will be exploring new places, using transit systems unfamiliar to us, in languages that we have no competency in. We will often worry about being scammed, cheated, or robbed… or just generally ending up in bad situations due to our mistakes or even just poor luck.
  • Traveling can be exhausting! We’re looking at a TON of long bus, train, rickshaw, taxi, and plane rides. Ugh.

So, while I’m sure that I will continue to think “only a few more months and I’m out of here!” every time something gets frustrating, I will remember that it won’t be a dream. Sometimes it will be gritty, real, and exhausting. I will miss you all very much and will hope you keep us updated on the big happenings in your lives!

Any comments on your experiences with long term travel would be appreciated!

 

 

 

How Do You Plan Something Like That?

Another question that we have been asked is how we are going to plan such a big trip. It can seem daunting, but it has also proved to be pretty fun because we are so excited!

Choose Some Highlights

The first thing we had to decide was what we were most excited to see.  We both had some ideas about what we wanted to see around the world such as: The Parthenon, other ancient world ruins in Greece and/or Turkey, Machu Picchu, the Amazon, the most southern points in the world, Penguins, Pyramids, the Taj Mahal, the Himalayas, castles in Europe, The Great Wall of China, Angkor Wat, etc. We both love ruins, history, and outdoor beauty. Della was interested in visiting some of the countries from which her students come from: Burma and Nepal.

 Save Some Places for the Future

After thinking about the highlights we wanted to see, we had a huge list! So we had to pare it down a bit. We first took into account that some places are easier to get to from the US than others. For example, we ultimately decided not to visit South America during this trip at all because it is so much easier to reach than all the other continents. We believe that we can fly to many countries in Central or South America for shorter vacations in our future. It is easier to plan a two week summer vacation when you are only a couple of hours away via plane. It is much harder to plan that same vacation when you know you will be spending over a day’s travel time on each end (plus jet lag). This thinking led us to focusing on Africa, Europe, and Asia on this trip.

 Choose a Direction

Next, we tried to see how we could make them fit together in some semblance of order. We did not want to flit all over the world in big plane rides – we’d rather want to travel overland where we could to save money. This led us to the idea that we were generally travelling one direction around the world – either west or east.

 Consider the Climate and Crowds

The next step was to look at the weather. We knew that we would rather avoid the hottest time of year, the coldest/wettest time of year, and busiest tourist season in every location. Knowing we were leaving in July helped us get an idea of where we wanted to be and when. Many round the world books have collected average temperature and rain data about different locations.The website Price of Travel also has a lot of good information about climate and tourist season, both on its location profile pages and in posts about the best cheap places to travel during certain months.

Once we read all this information, we were a little overwhelmed. Then Eric’s nerd side came out and he decided to try and organize it visually. He decided to get some old-fashioned notecards and lay out an itinerary. First he made notecards for each month. Then, he made a notecard for each of the potential destinations and listed on the cards when it was best to visit the destination, when it was OK, and when to avoid. We then laid these cards out and tried to optimize for the “best” category.

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Using this system helped us come up with a general flow of the trip: Africa first, Europe next, and Asia last. We do get to Africa during the coldest part of the year, but it is the best time for wildlife watching. This also helps us avoid the worst of the summer crowds in Europe. Also, we will get to Asia during the best (least hot) weather months.

Consider the Costs

We also looked at the relative cost of traveling in all locations we wanted to visit. We wanted to stick to a $100/day or less budget for the two of us. This, unfortunately, made us reconsider visiting many of the countries in Europe. However, the great news was once we decided that many of the countries in Western Europe were too expensive for this trip, it made us start to research more about countries that we knew very little about. Suddenly, countries like Slovakia, Slovenia, Croatia, Montenegro, and Albania were on our list.

 Dive In

Finally, we had a general idea of the countries we wanted to visit and the order in which we could visit them.  The next step was to learn more about each country in an effort to plan the approximate amount of time we might want to spend there.

This became very tricky as we don’t want to over-plan the trip. This actually has been our biggest struggle in planning – attempting to plan too much! The beauty of a long trip is that we can shape the trip as we go. We can spend more time in places that we enjoy or less in places that we don’t. We will become exhausted if we are constantly on the move and should try to plan some down time in certain locales.

Still, we want to do a little planning, so we decided to start with guide books. We are true believers in Lonely Planet guide books and have used many to guide our research. One thing that has been invaluable is the Denver Public Library. It offers loans on almost all Lonely Planet books that are quite recent. We have been able to get the guide books from the library and spend time reading through the various sites – giving us possible time tables and ideas about the best way to travel from one location to another.

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Read Travel Blogs

The guide books are a great resource for learning about a destination, but it’s also nice to hear more personal stories to really get a feel for the place. Luckily, on the Internet it is now very easy to find such stories! Often, if we want to read about a place, we will just Google “<place name> travel blog”, and a ton of results pop up.

There are a few other web resources that we like to check. Wikitravel provides advice similar to a guidebook, so it’s a good place to use for cross-referencing. We also like to check Trip Advisor reviews to make sure that the places we are thinking of get good reviews.

Keep Track of It All

It’d be nice if we could remember all of this information we’ve found, but when you’re planning a whole year that’s somewhat hard to do! Our solution has been to keep track of what we have found in a set of Google Drive documents. This way, we can both edit them, and we will be able to access them from anywhere. Whenever we find a noteworthy link, we add it to the corresponding document for future reference.

Always Be Planning

It’d be foolish to say that we have come up with our final plan. We are hoping that part of the fun of this adventure will be experiencing some unplanned and surprising things! So, we are hoping to use all this research as a basic guide but will continue to seek out new information about the places we are going to go. You can check out the Itinerary link on our to see where we’re currently planning to go… but don’t be surprised if you see it change!

Learning Something New Everyday!

Did you know that a braai is a BBQ grill?

Did you know that an ablutions block is a bathroom?

I didn’t. But now I do! At least they are in South Africa, Namibia, and Botswana.

We’re getting close to having our plan put in place for our self-drive safari! (More details to come)

How Can You Afford to go Around the World?

This is another one of the questions that we get quite often when we tell people about our trip plans.  The answer is both really easy and really difficult. Traveling like this will definitely require a significant amount of cash.

The first answer is that this trip is a priority for us, so we have been saving money. We are extremely fortunate to be debt-free (except for the house) so we can afford to put money towards savings.

The rest of the answer is not as clear-cut. We believe that traveling in the way that we want to may be significantly cheaper than living a year in our normal manner here in the U.S.

In our initial effort to think about the budget for the trip, we gave ourselves a daily limit. We plan to spend no more than $100/day for the two of us. This would be an average of course, because naturally there will be bigger expenses on some days and less on others. We hope to get several of our large flights covered by airline miles, which will help keep the costs down. We also know as we move through different areas of the world, the cost of living will change drastically. We believe that there are places where we can spend much less than our $100/day and some places where the $100/day limit will be a struggle. In addition, we know that there will be certain “adventures” we want to experience that may cost more. But, based on our experiences traveling in the past, we think that the limit is reasonable.

Using the $100/day plan, we can assume we will spend approximately $3000/month. $3000 times our potential trip length of 10-12 months would get us up to ~$35,000 for the two of us. With our savings, as well as perhaps a little income from renting our house, this seems doable. It is quite a bit less than what it costs to live here in Denver for a year!

As for traveling cheaply, stay tuned to the blog for our budget posts. We’ll let you know how easy or difficult it turns out to be to stay within our budget. Also, we might give you some ideas about how to travel more economically and where in the world you can visit without breaking the bank.

How We’re Getting to Africa for $7

One of our first steps in planning the trip is to buy plane tickets. You may think this would be a big expense, but with a little effort you can get a ticket for really cheap. Like the title says, our main tickets to Africa from the US are only going to cost us $7 total!

Ticket Types

One of the early decisions we had to make was what type of ticket to buy. The big airline alliances do sell “round the world” tickets which allow you to group a bunch of different flights under a one fare. We looked into this, but in the end we decided it wasn’t the best fit for us. On one of the RTW tickets, you are only allowed a certain number of stops, and you have to plan out your dates far in advance. We want to figure out some of that as we go, so not exactly a match for us. Plus, we would have had to pay lots of money for that. But why pay money when you have miles?

Using Miles to Buy Plane Tickets

For the past few years, we have gone on many trips for very little money out of pocket.We do this by “paying” for the flights with frequent flyer miles.

We don’t actually rack up the miles by flying though. Instead, we get big chunks of miles by applying for credit cards with hefty sign up bonuses. It may sound risky, but if you are careful with how you use the credit cards (like we always are) then it can get you some great deals.

Getting credit cards is only a good solution if you are responsible with how you use them. Always make sure to pay off your balance in full every month!! You may worry about negative effects on you credit score, but in our experience our scores have stayed fairly constant.

For some of the cards, you only get the sign up bonus if you complete what they call a “minimum spend”. It’s usually a few thousand dollars within a few months. We don’t typically put that much on a credit card, so we’ve had to figure out some creative ways to do this. If you’re interested, let us know and we can share our strategies.

Getting to South Africa

Based on a variety of factors, we decided to start our trip in South Africa. We knew from research that the best miles to redeem to get to South Africa would be United miles. (We aren’t actually flying on United though. One other cool thing about miles is that you can redeem them on an airline’s alliance partners. United in in Star Alliance along with a few African airlines).

We also knew from the award chart that you need 40,000 United miles to get to South Africa from the US. Luckily, we also knew that the Chase Sapphire Preferred card offered a signup bonus of 40,000 United miles. We each got the card, completed the minimum spending requirement, and had our miles.

Then we had to search for the flight. Using the United website, we searched for award redemptions to Johannesburg from a variety of U.S. cities. Unfortunately, availability was a little limited so we didn’t have a lot of options. We were this close to flying via Nigeria until we read some horror stories about layovers there. On the other hand, we read some positive things about layovers in Cairo, so we ended up booking a ticket on Egypt Air. We should have time on our 12 hour layover to see the pyramids – pretty cool!

But, very little in life is free unfortunately. There are some fees associated with the journey: $3.50 per person. So, we can’t say we are flying to South Africa for free. It’s going to cost us a whole $7.

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You may notice that we still need to figure out how to get to NYC for our flight. No definite plans on that yet, but we are hoping we can figure out a way to use miles :-).

If you’re interested in learning more about how to travel for cheap, here are some resources we enjoy:

You’re Taking a Year Off to Go Around the World??

Telling people that you’re planning on taking a year off to travel around the world is always an interesting experience. The range of reactions you get is quite large. Some people can barely contain their excitement for us while others can scarcely hold in their horror. There are definitely some commonalities though. The largest being the question: How in the world did you decide to do that?

We thought we would focus on that idea: How does one decide to take a year off from their established life and travel around the world?

The answer is varied of course. There are as many reasons as there are people who decide to do it! There are some answers that you would probably get from almost everyone, however.

General Reasons:

1. The world is a gigantic place. How else would you find the time to see and experience all the amazing things out there? With close to 200 countries on our globe, you could never find enough time to visit all the sites that are worth seeing. Taking a year to do it seems like a necessary step.

2. Sometimes a break from the day to day grind is welcome and needed. It becomes very easy to get bogged down and potentially disenchanted with the jobs that we do every day. A year to explore, awaken our senses, and reevaluate the reasons that we choose our jobs in the first place may be necessary.

3. For some people, there is an innate desire to stretch the boundaries of our comfort zones. A trip like this can make us supremely uncomfortable at times, but at the same time teach us how to be stronger. If we can navigate our way through different cultures, with different languages, without the comforts of home, there is nothing we can’t do!

 

In addition to the general reasons, every person has something that tipped them over the edge, or ultimately brought them to this kind of decision. We thought it might be interesting to explain our stories separately, because we came to our choice to travel in very different ways.

Della’s Reasons:

1. This in many ways sounds silly, but it is definitely true: I wanted to do something like this because my parents did. I have heard about their trip since I was tiny. They describe their trip with such humor and excitement that I couldn’t help but want to do one of my own. Because of their stories (of which there are many that I have heard over and over again), it has been a lifelong dream of mine to see all the places that they saw – and more!

2. There is so much to see and know in the world. I want to see and know it all. I feel like the travels that I have done in the past have opened my eyes to such diversity and have helped me form my views on life. I am intrigued to learn more.

3. The adrenaline rush! Figuring out how to survive day to day in completely foreign situations is very exciting. Plus, I want to see if I can do it.

Eric’s Reasons:

Della is making me.

Just kidding! But I certainly can’t claim that I have had the RTW travel bug for as long as Della has. I had done a decent amount of domestic travel before I met Della but she has opened my eyes to the world of international travel. So these are my main reasons:

1. The quest for knowledge. There is so much going on all around the globe that I only vaguely know about and want to learn more about. Or there are things that I have learned that I have forgotten. But I feel like traveling helps you connect with stories from the past and the present in much more detail, and to remember those stories better in the future.

2. It’s not as hard as I thought it would be. Originally, when Della told me about her parents’ trip and her grand vision, I thought it sounded impossible to pull off. But some quick Googling proved that many people have done it before, and they have published excellent planning resources.

3. I don’t want to be too old to cross things off of my “bucket list.” Well, first off, “bucket list” seems somewhat overplayed so I’m going to not use that terminology. But the idea is the same – many people put off doing things that interest them until they have completed the “normal” life checklist. But what if by the time you are fully retired your health has declined? Or you are in a situation where it’s impossible to go? There’s no time like the present to just do it, because while it may be a gamble to deviate from the “traditional” path of earning money, it’s also a gamble to assume that you’ll be able to do everything you want in 30 years.

4. I’m kind of a nerd when it comes to planning things, and travel provides an outlet for doing cool research and then seeing it come to fruition. It’s fun to spend a bunch of time researching the best options and then seeing it pay off.

5. Meeting people with a wide variety of stories. In our past international travels, we have met people from all over the world and had a great time hanging out. Being able to learn about other cultures and share our culture is fun! Plus, remember how at summer camp you felt like you had made best friends for life by the end of the week? Meeting someone out traveling often feels like that as well.